Lecture by Cian T. McMahon

Cian T. McMahon, Associate Professor in the Department of History and Honors College at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, lectures on “The Coffin Ship: Life and Death at Sea during the Great Famine” with introduction by Paul Muldoon as part of the 2021-22 Fund for Irish Studies lecture series.

Cian T. McMahon, Associate Professor in the Department of History and Honors College at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, lectures on “The Coffin Ship: Life and Death at Sea during the Great Famine” with introduction by Paul Muldoon as part of the 2021-22 Fund for Irish Studies lecture series.

The standard story of Ireland’s Great Famine exodus is one of tired clichés, half-truths, and dry statistics. In The Coffin Ship, a groundbreaking work of transnational history, Cian T. McMahon offers a vibrant, fresh perspective on an oft-ignored but vital component of the migration experience: the journey itself. In so doing, McMahon makes an ambitious argument for placing the sailing ship alongside the tenement and the factory floor as a central, dynamic element of migration history.

cian with dark hair in slight profile viewCian T. McMahon is Associate Professor in the Department of History and Honors College at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas and the author of The Global Dimensions of Irish Identity: Race, Nation, and the Popular Press, 1840-1880 (2015). His new book, The Coffin Ship: Life and Death at Sea during the Great Irish Famine (2021), available from New York University Press, is the second monograph in the Glucksman Irish Diaspora Series, edited by Kevin Kenny.

Join the Event

This virtual event is free and open to the public. Register for the lecture and join via Zoom Webinar.

NOTE: A recording will not be available to share with the public following the event.

Accessibility

The event includes live closed captions in English. Patrons can join the Webinar and connect directly to the captioned event through StreamText. Reference these instructions for using StreamText (PDF).

If you are in need of other access accommodations in order to participate in this event, please contact the Lewis Center at 609-258-5262 or email LewisCenter@princeton.edu at least 2 weeks in advance of the event date.

Lecture by Brendan O’Leary

Brendan O’Leary, Lauder Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania, presents “Irish Reunification: Prospects & Feasible Models,” a lecture drawn from his book-in-progress on questions and issues surrounding the idea of a unification of the island of Ireland. Introduced by Fintan O’Toole.

Brendan O’Leary, Lauder Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania, presents “Irish Reunification: Prospects & Feasible Models,” a lecture drawn from his book-in-progress on questions and issues surrounding the idea of a unification of the island of Ireland. Introduced by Fintan O’Toole.

brendan standing in dark rocky caveBrendan O’Leary is a US, Irish and European Union citizen. Since 2003, he has served as the Lauder Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania—previously he had been Professor of Political Science at the London School of Economics & Political Science. He is the author, co-author and co-editor of 28 books, and the author or co-author of over 650 articles, chapters, encyclopedia articles, miscellaneous publications, and op-eds. A Treatise on Northern Ireland (three volumes) was published in 2019. It won the 2020 James S. Donnelly Sr. Prize of the American Conference of Irish Studies for the best book in History and Social Science, and the paperback versions were issued the same year. A Member of the US Council on Foreign Relations and an Honorary Member of the Royal Irish Academy, O’Leary was the inaugural winner of the Juan Linz Prize of the International Political Science Association for the study of multinational societies, federalism, and democratization. He is also a founding member of ARINS (Analyzing and Researching Ireland, North and South), sponsored by the Royal Irish Academy and the University of Notre Dame. O’Leary has been a political and constitutional advisor, especially on power-sharing, to the United Nations, the European Union, the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) of Iraq, and during the Irish peace process to the Governments of the UK and Ireland, and the British Labour Party. His degrees are from the University of Oxford (1981, PPE, BA (hons) first class), and the London School of Economics & Political Science (PhD, Robert McKenzie Memorial Prize). He grew up in Nigeria, Sudan, and Northern Ireland.

Join the Event

This virtual event is free and open to the public. Register for the lecture and join via Zoom Webinar.

NOTE: A recording will not be available to share with the public following the event.

Accessibility

The event includes live closed captions in English. Patrons can join the Webinar and connect directly to the captioned event through StreamText. Reference these instructions for using StreamText (PDF).

If you are in need of other access accommodations in order to participate in this event, please contact the Lewis Center at 609-258-5262 or email LewisCenter@princeton.edu at least 2 weeks in advance of the event date.

Lecture by Nicholas Allen

Scholar and author Nicholas Allen lectures on “Seamus Heaney’s Late Poems” as part of the 2021-22 Fund for Irish Studies lecture series. FREE and open to the public. Register and join via Zoom Webinar. Live closed captions available.

Nicholas Allen, director of the Willson Center for Humanities and Arts at the University of Georgia, discusses poet Seamus Heaney’s later works, one of several Irish writers covered in his latest book, Ireland, Literature and the Coast: Seatangled. Introduced by Lecturer in Theater Fintan O’Toole as part of the 2021-22 Fund for Irish Studies lecture series.

nicholas in jeans seated on couch by lamp in living room
Photo courtesy Nicholas Allen

Nicholas Allen is the director of the Willson Center for Humanities and Arts, where he holds an endowed Professorship in the Humanities. His latest book, Ireland, Literature, and the Coast: Seatangled, was published in December 2020 by Oxford University Press. He has been the Burns Visiting Scholar at Boston College and has received many grants and awards, including from the Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Irish Research Council.

 

Join the Event

This virtual event is free and open to the public. Register for the lecture and join via Zoom Webinar.

NOTE: A recording will not be available to share with the public following the event.

Accessibility

The event includes live closed captions in English. Patrons can join the Webinar and connect directly to the captioned event through StreamText. Reference these instructions for using StreamText (PDF).

If you are in need of other access accommodations in order to participate in this event, please contact the Lewis Center at 609-258-5262 or email LewisCenter@princeton.edu at least 2 weeks in advance of the event date.

“History of Ireland in 100 (and More) Words” with Máire ní Mhaonaigh and Sharon Arbuthnot

Authors Máire ní Mhaonaigh and Sharon Arbuthnot present on “A History of Ireland in 100 (and More) Words,” with an introduction by Professor Paul Muldoon, as part of the 2021-22 Fund for Irish Studies lecture series. FREE and open to public; register and join via Zoom Webinar.

Authors Máire ní Mhaonaigh and Sharon Arbuthnot present on “A History of Ireland in 100 (and More) Words,” with an introduction by Professor Paul Muldoon, as part of the 2021-22 Fund for Irish Studies lecture series.

Maire smiling with chin length auburn hair
Photo courtesy Maire Ni Mhaonaigh

Máire Ní Mhaonaigh is Professor of Celtic and Medieval Studies at the University of Cambridge (United Kingdom) and a Fellow of St John’s College. She works at the interface of history and literature, her research focusing on medieval constructions of the past. She has published widely on medieval Irish literature and history and on Ireland’s place in the wider world. She has contributed chapters to the Cambridge History of Irish Literature and to the recent multi-volume Cambridge History of Ireland. Among other recent publications are a co-authored volume, Norse-Gaelic Contacts in a Viking World (with Colmán Etchingham, Jón Vidar Sigurðsson and Elizabeth Ashman Rowe, 2019), exploring the cultural and political connections between Norse and Gaelic speakers in the high Middle Ages; and A History of Ireland in 100 Words (co-written with Sharon Arbuthnot and Greg Toner, 2019) illuminating aspects of Ireland’s past through the development of words. She co-led a project on the electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language which resulted in a revised and augmented version of that resource, eDIL 2019; and she is currently directing research on the landscape history of medieval Ireland, ‘Mapping the Medieval Mind: Ireland’s Literary Landscapes in a Global Space’, illuminating medieval dinnshenchas, a literature of place (a Leverhulme Trust project 2020-2025). She chairs the board of the School of Celtic Studies of the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, and serves on many other bodies, including the editorial board of Interfaces: A Journal of Medieval European Literatures and the Advisory Board of the Centre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures (Hamburg).

JOIN THE EVENT

This virtual event is free and open to the public. Register and join the lecture via Zoom Webinar.

REGISTER FOR THE LECTURE

NOTE: A recording will not be available to share with the public following the event.

ACCESSIBILITY

The event includes live closed captions in English. Patrons can join the Webinar and connect directly to the captioned event through StreamText. Reference these instructions for using StreamText (PDF).

If you are in need of other access accommodations in order to participate in this event, please contact the Lewis Center at 609-258-5262 or email LewisCenter@princeton.edu at least 2 weeks in advance of the event date.

 


The Fund for Irish Studies affords all Princeton students, and the community at large, a wider and deeper sense of the languages, literatures, drama, visual arts, history, politics, and economics not only of Ireland but of “Ireland in the world.” The series is produced by the Lewis Center for the Arts and the 2021-22 edition of the series is organized by Paul Muldoon and Fintan O’Toole.

The Fund for Irish Studies is generously sponsored by the Durkin Family Trust and the James J. Kerrigan, Jr. ’45 and Margaret M. Kerrigan Fund for Irish Studies.

Conversation with Roddy Doyle and Fintan O’Toole

Irish novelist, dramatist, and screenwriter Roddy Doyle joins in conversation with scholar and critic Fintan O’Toole. Professor Paul Muldoon opens the virtual event with an introduction. FREE and open to public; register and join via Zoom webinar.

Irish novelist, dramatist, and screenwriter Roddy Doyle joins in conversation with scholar and critic Fintan O’Toole. Professor Paul Muldoon opens the virtual event with an introduction.

JOIN THE EVENT

This virtual event is free and open to the public. Register and join the lecture via Zoom Webinar.

REGISTER FOR THE LECTURE

NOTE: A recording will not be available to share with the public following the event.

 

ACCESSIBILITY

The event includes live closed captions in English. Patrons can join the Webinar and connect directly to the captioned event through StreamText. Reference these instructions for using StreamText (PDF).

If you are in need of other access accommodations in order to participate in this event, please contact the Lewis Center at 609-258-5262 or email LewisCenter@princeton.edu at least 2 weeks in advance of the event date.

 


The Fund for Irish Studies affords all Princeton students, and the community at large, a wider and deeper sense of the languages, literatures, drama, visual arts, history, politics, and economics not only of Ireland but of “Ireland in the world.” The series is produced by the Lewis Center for the Arts and the 2021-22 edition of the series is organized by Paul Muldoon and Fintan O’Toole.

The Fund for Irish Studies is generously sponsored by the Durkin Family Trust and the James J. Kerrigan, Jr. ’45 and Margaret M. Kerrigan Fund for Irish Studies.